Highlights from 2016 IWWIP Annual Meeting

Posted by moleary on . Posted in Uncategorized

IWWIP 2015 Annual Meeting Participants. Photo: Kumarse Nazari/ICARDA

IWWIP 2015 Annual Meeting Participants. Photo: Kumarse Nazari/ICARDA

By Aziz A. Karimov

ILGAZ (CIMMYT) – The International Winter Wheat Improvement Program’s (IWWIP) 2015 achievements in developing improved winter wheat varieties for Central and West Asia were presented by IWWIP coordinators and Turkish collaborators during the program’s annual meeting in Ilgaz, Turkey.

Maize lethal necrosis field day demonstrates promising maize germplasm

Posted by moleary on . Posted in Uncategorized

Participants see a demonstration of artificial inoculation at MLN screening site. photo K. Kaimenyi (CIMMYT)

Participants see a demonstration of artificial inoculation at MLN screening site. photo K. Kaimenyi /CIMMYT

By Brenda Wawa

Since maize lethal necrosis (MLN) was first reported in Kenya in 2011, CIMMYT and its partners, including Kenya Agricultural and Livestock Research Organization (KALRO), have been intensively engaged in breeding for resistance to the disease, which was later confirmed to be present in D.R. Congo, Ethiopia, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda.

New book details benefits of holistic approach to agricultural development in Mexico

Posted by Katelyn Roett on . Posted in Uncategorized

Foto: MasAgro

Foto/MasAgro

Luz Paola López

 

Mexico’s Secretariat of Agriculture, Livestock, Rural Development, Fisheries and Food (SAGARPA) and CIMMYT are investing in the creation, development and strengthening of farmers and technicians by conducting research and development of new farmer technologies through the MasAgro project’s Take it to the Farmer extension strategy.

FAO has its finger on the ‘pulse’ when it comes to food security

Posted by moleary on . Posted in Uncategorized

The Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has declared 2016 the International Year of Pulses.

The Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has declared 2016 the International Year of Pulses.

Luz Paola López

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) has declared 2016 the International Year of Pulses under the motto “Nutritious seeds for a sustainable future.” Pulses, an annual leguminous crop yielding from one to 12 seeds (dry beans, kidney beans, dry peas, lentils and others), have been named by the FAO as essential in the fight for food security for their nutrient value and their key role in crop rotations through the ability to fix nitrogen.

Interview with CIMMYT Director General Martin Kropff in Pakistan

Posted by Katelyn Roett on . Posted in Uncategorized

CIMMYT-Pakistan team photo with CIMMYT Director General Martin Kropff (first row, fourth from the left) and former CIMMYT Director General Thomas Lumpkin (front row, fifth from the left). Photo: Awais Yaqub/ CIMMYT

CIMMYT-Pakistan team photo with CIMMYT Director General Martin Kropff and former CIMMYT Director General Thomas Lumpkin (front row, fourth and fifth from the left, respectively). Photo: Amina Nasim Khan/ CIMMYT

Nasim Khan

Amina Nasim Khan and Akhlaq Hussain

From 23 – 26 August, 2015, CIMMYT’s Director General Martin Kropff visited Pakistan to attend the Agricultural Innovation Program’s (AIP) annual conference in Islamabad. Following the conference Kropff met with the CIMMYT team to talk about his observations, suggestions and way forward for continued impact in Pakistan.

How to work with agricultural innovation systems

Posted by Katelyn Roett on . Posted in Uncategorized

Guadalupe Mata

Nota1

Participants of the “Designing projects focusing on agricultural innovation systems” workshop. Photo: CIMMYT

Agricultural innovation systems (AIS) are networks that contribute to creating, disseminating and using scientific and technological knowledge, as well as coordinating and supporting technological processes. However, the way in which farm projects are designed and research processes are organized has hindered the implementation of these systems. In order to establish guidelines for designing these type of initiatives, the CGIAR Research Program on MAIZE and the Royal Tropical Institute (KIT) of the Netherlands organized a workshop called “Designing projects focusing on agricultural innovation systems” in Wageningen, the Netherlands, on 11-13 December 2015.

Will we feed humanity by 2050?

Posted by Katelyn Roett on . Posted in Uncategorized

Luz Paola López

Bram Govaerts, Leader of CIMMYT's program on Sustainable Intensification in Latin America, speaks at the Oxford Farming Conference. Photo: CIMMYT

Bram Govaerts, Leader of CIMMYT’s program on Sustainable Intensification in Latin America, speaks at the Oxford Farming Conference. Photo: CIMMYT

“Imagine a sports car designed to travel at high speed on paved highways, running on a gravel road. It’s going to break down, isn’t it? The same thing happens when agricultural technologies are applied without using smart agronomy to increase input use efficiency, protect the environment and ensure sustainability,” said Bram Govaerts, Leader of CIMMYT’s program on Sustainable Intensification in Latin America.

Govaerts presented at a keynote speech titled “Ending hunger: Can we achieve humanity’s elusive goal by 2050?” at the Oxford Farming Conference (OFC) of the University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom, on 5-7 January. The conference has been held in Oxford for more than 70 years with the aim of contributing to the improvement and welfare of British agriculture. Farmers, researchers, politicians and economists from across the world attend the event. This year, the main theme was “Daring Agriculture,” including such subjects as global agriculture, innovation, sustainable intensification, technology and agribusiness.

Recent Publications from CIMMYT Staff

Posted by Katelyn Roett on . Posted in Uncategorized

The latest research from CIMMYT covers gender and agriculture in Malawi, topsoil and organic carbon variability, and reallocation of farm resources. Explore the latest publications below, and remember to stay current on new articles related to maize/wheat/conservation agriculture, CIMMYT journal articles, CIMMYT library’s acquisitions and related news at the Knowledge Center’s blog here

Is the next food crisis coming? Are we ready to respond?

Posted by Katelyn Roett on . Posted in Uncategorized

By Martin Kropff

A farmer in his barren field in Ethiopia, projected to become the most food insecure country in the world. Photo: Kyle DeGraw/Save The Children UK

A farmer in his barren field in Ethiopia, projected to become the most food insecure country in the world. Photo: Kyle DeGraw/Save The Children UK

One of the strongest El Niños on record is underway, threatening millions of agricultural livelihoods – and lives.

At least ten million people in the developing world are facing hunger due to droughts and erratic rainfall as global temperatures reach new records coupled with the onset of a powerful El Niño – the climate phenomenon that develops in the tropical Pacific and brings extreme weather across the world. Warmer than usual waters in the Pacific have made this year’s El Niño a contender for the strongest on record, currently held by the 1997 El Niño, which caused over $35 billion in global economic losses and claimed an estimated 23,000 lives. These extreme El Niños are twice as likely to occur due to climate change, according to a letter published in Nature magazine by researchers at McGill University, Montreal, Canada, and the University of Sussex, Brighton, UK.

From East Asia to South Asia, via Mexico: How One Gene Changed the Course of History

Posted by Katelyn Roett on . Posted in Uncategorized

Miriam Shindler

Norman Borlaug in the field teaching a group of young trainees. Photo: CIMMYT

Norman Borlaug in the field teaching a group of young trainees. Photo: CIMMYT

In 1935, Japanese scientist Gonjoro Inazuka crossed a semi-dwarf Japanese wheat landrace with two American varieties resulting in an improved variety, known as Norin 10. Norin 10 derived varieties eventually ended up in the hands of Norman Borlaug, beginning one of the most extraordinary agricultural revolutions in history. This international exchange of germplasm ultimately saved hundreds of millions of people from starvation and revolutionized the world of wheat.

The journey of semi-dwarf wheat from Japan to Mexico may have begun in the 3rd or 4th century in Korea, where short wheat varieties are thought to have originated. From East Asia, wheat breeders began to seek and utilize dwarfing genes to breed varieties with high yield potential, resistance to lodging and the ability to produce more tillers than traditional varieties.

The term Norin is an acronym for the Japanese Agricultural Experiment Station spelled out using Latin letters. From 150 centimeters (cm) that other varieties measured, Norin 10 reduced wheat plant height to 60-110 cm. The shorter stature is a result of the reduced height genes Rht1 and Rht2.

The International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) edits and publishes an internet periodical in blog format entitled “CIMMYT.” The International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center is domiciled at Km. 45 Carretera México-Veracruz, Col, el Batán, Texcoco, Estado de México, México, C.P. 56237; phone + 52 (55) 5804-2004; www.cimmyt.org. Responsible Editor: Genevieve Renard. Reserved Right for Exclusive Use granted by the Mexican Copyright Office (valid in Mexico) no. 04-2013-091212312700-203. Responsible for updating this blog: Katelyn Roett, Km. 45 Carretera México -Veracruz, El Batán, Texcoco, Estado de México. C. P. 56150, México. Weekly update. © CIMMYT 2014.

International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT) Copyright © 2014